Guess What? Fasano is Pretty Freakin’ Good

20 May

There were a lot of cries to bring in a new tight end this season. Hopefully Charles Clay can make some noise in Davie as a TE/HBack/Fullback/Longsnapper/Waterboy/Trainer combo and become one of those sleepers talked about for ages. Still, we felt the need to point out that Anthony “First Down” Fasano is a lot better than people think.

Much of the chatter about bringing in a new guy was that we needed someone more vertical. Not for nothing, but Fasano averaged more yards per catch than Zach Miller, Dustin Keller, Brent Celek, Chris Cooley and Kellen Winslow. Hell, Fasano averaged more per grab than Hakeem Nicks, Larry Fitzgerald and Anquan Boldin too. Not too shabby for a tight end who supposedly can’t stretch the field.

The most incredible Fasano stat? In 2010, 74% of his catches were good for first downs. Those are extremely clutch numbers, and third among tight ends behind Pro Bowlers Antonio Gates and Todd Heap.  For his career, 65% of Fasano’s catches have moved the chains and kept drives alive. To give you an little historical perspective, Jim “Crash” Jensen, famous for finding the first down marker, had a 57.6% conversion rate.

It’s always good to bring in fresh talent and competition, but while Clay learns the ropes we have no problem at all going to war with Anthony Fasano at tight end. He’s underrated, and acquiring him on the cheap was a strong move by The Trifecta.

GO DOLPHINS, and feel free to follow us on Twitter @thebottlenose 

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26 Responses to “Guess What? Fasano is Pretty Freakin’ Good”

  1. Donald McClenaghan May 20, 2011 at 5:24 pm #

    Yeah, I don’t understand the Fasano bashing – he had a couple drops but who doesn’t? If anything, he was vastly underutilized in the passing game.

    • Dan Ewen May 20, 2011 at 5:31 pm #

      Agreed 100%. Sometimes people just start piling on a guy, regardless of what the stats say.

      Thanks for dropping by, and have a good weekend.

      Go Dolphins!

  2. Still Annoyed by fools May 20, 2011 at 5:38 pm #

    Good article! It’s to the point, backed up with a nice use of statistics, and is a nice change from the Henne/Sparano/fill in Dolphin of your choice sucks variety of article.

    • Dan Ewen May 20, 2011 at 5:51 pm #

      I sincerely hope that Henne and Sparano make the most of their statistical opportunities in the future. Such articles would become more and more rare.

      Thanks for the comment and have a nice weekend.

  3. Jayrock May 20, 2011 at 11:08 pm #

    I hope you realize that the yards per catch average is calculated by dividing the amount of total yards by receptions. So the more receptions a receiver has the lower his average will be. With that being said you failed to mention that practically all of those tights ends you listed had better statistical years than Fasano  In terms of receptions and yardage

    No offense but it wasn’t really smart throwing in names like Larry Fitzgerald and Hakeem Nicks to prove your point. Fitzgerald is an elite receiver in the league and the only reason his yards per catch is comparable with Fasano is because of the inconsistent play at QB the Cardinals had last year. As for Nicks he caught 80 passes for over 1000 yards despite missing some games to injury. And Anquan Boldin throughout his career has never been known to stretch the field. As a matter if fact all three of those wide receivers you listed are more of the possession type. Fitzgerald had 50 more catches than Fasano and Nicks had about 40 and they both went over 1000 yards on the season so of course their yards per grab average will be similar to Fasanos 39 catches for like 500 yards.

    • Dan Ewen May 21, 2011 at 12:14 am #

      No disrespect Jayrock, but the more catches someone has doesn’t mean their average per catch goes down. That simply isn’t how averages work. Their yardage total climbs with every catch. If Fasano added twenty catches to his total would they suddenly all be two yards long? No. They’d probably be similar to the dozens of catches he’d already made.

      And the Cards had a down year, sure. But Fasano’s ypc were greater than Fitzgerald’s CAREER average (in 7 seasons). So we can eliminate the down year argument.

      And lastly, it isn’t like the Dolphins were getting the most consistent play at quarterback either. With as many stalled drives as we endured, Fasano’s 74% first down rate is beyond impressive. He pulled his weight in a big way.

      Thanks for your comment. Go Dolphins.

      • Jayrock May 21, 2011 at 3:45 am #

        Actually that is how it works. For example Kellen Winslow had 66 receptions for 730 yards last season and according to NFL.com his average is 11.1 yards per catch. If you pick up your calculator and divide 730 by 66 you get 11.06 (round it and you get the 11.1 calculated by NFL.com) coincidence huh? It’s called average for a reason. Now when I say the more receptions a player has the lower hid ypc I mean that in terms of bring relative to the amount of yardage as well.

        If you look at Fitzgeralds 1st 5 years in the league he was a consistent 13.4-14.9 ypc average  This year he had 12.6 so yea it was a down year in that category.  If your trying to take his career work and compare to ONE season by Fasano thats ludacris.

        I like Fasano as a player but your trying to put him in the level of some of the better tight ends in the league which he is not…YET

      • Dan Ewen May 21, 2011 at 7:49 am #

        Yet strangely Kellen Winslow’s ypc through the first eight games was 10.2. More catches can improve an average, lower it, keep it the same. You are simply mistaken about how averages work, Jayrock. But I forgive you because it’s the end of the world.

      • Jayrock May 21, 2011 at 8:18 am #

        Wow really bro? In case you didn’t read thoroughly I said the amount of receptions relative to the amount of total yards lowers a players ypc. The first 8 games for Winslow included a bye week so it’s really 7 but anyway Winslow had 30 catches for 306 in the 1st 8 weeks. For the rest of the year he had 36 for 424. So he had 6 more catches but he also had 118 more yards than those first few weeks so ofcourse his average will go up.

        Oh and the world is not going to end genius it’s already Saturday in china

      • Dan Ewen May 21, 2011 at 9:50 am #

        “I hope you realize that the yards per catch average is calculated by dividing the amount of total yards by receptions. So the more receptions a receiver has the lower his average will be.”

        “Fitzgerald had 50 more catches than Fasano and Nicks had about 40 and they both went over 1000 yards on the season so of course their yards per grab average will be similar to Fasanos 39 catches for like 500 yards.”

        No disrespect, but these statements are simply bad math, man. Are you saying that if those players had the same number of catches as Fasano those would somehow be longer catches? They would suddenly be getting further downfield? Brandon Lloyd and Calvin Johnson had the exact same number of catches (about 40 more than Fasano), but Lloyd had over 300 more yards. Why isn’t Lloyd’s average similar to Fasano’s? How did he magically average 18 yards per reception?

        Fitzgerald, Nicks, Winslow, were not getting as far downfield as Fasano last year. They just weren’t. Did they have more catches? Yes. Were any of them the 3rd option behind a #1 WR and maybe the best slot WR in the game? No.

        FIRST DOWN PERCENTAGE, 2010
        Fasano 74%
        Marshall 66%
        Bess 54%

        Fasano made it count as the third option on our offense, and I think the case that he is underrated is strong.

      • Jayrock May 21, 2011 at 10:31 am #

        “I hope you realize that the yards per catch average is calculated by dividing the amount of total yards by receptions.”

        This statement is exactly how the yards per catch average is calculated and if you don’t understand that basis of my argument than I can’t help you.

        Now once again when I say the amount of receptions affects a players YPC average I mean that in terms of being relative to the amount of total yards they have accumulated.

        “Are you saying that if those players had the same number of catches as Fasano those would somehow be longer catches? They would suddenly be getting further downfield?”

        No what I am saying is that if Fitzgerald’s and Nicks yardage totals from last year remained the same but had only 39 receptions like Fasano then their YPC average would be through the roof. Thats just hypothetically speakin Im not literally saying that if Fitz and Nicks only had 39 receptions on the season that they would have over 1,000 yards like they did. By the way Fitzgerald and Nicks are more possession type receivers anyway, they are not exactly known for beating people deep on a regular basis.

        “Brandon Lloyd and Calvin Johnson had the exact same number of catches (about 40 more than Fasano), but Lloyd had over 300 more yards. Why isn’t Lloyd’s average similar to Fasano’s? How did he magically average 18 yards per reception?”

        What the hell are you talking about? Like I said before the amount of receptions a player has will have an affect relative to the amount of total yardage. So Llyod and Johnson had the same amount of receptions but Llyod had 328 more yards so ofcourse Llyods YPC average will be higher. Also why the hell would Llyods average be similar to Fasano when he had 40 more receptions BUT most importantly 920 more yards off of those receptions.

        “Were any of them the 3rd option behind a #1 WR and maybe the best slot WR in the game? No.”

        How the hell is Fasano the 3rd option when Brian Hartline had more targets and receptions than him? Oh an another thing where exactly did you get those percentages from?

      • Dan Ewen May 21, 2011 at 11:20 am #

        Oh. You were just saying that hypothetically, if you gave Nicks and Fitzgerald the same receptions as Fasano, but kept their yardage, the yards per catch would be insane? Yes, Fitzgerald would have almost 30 yards per catch, and he’d celebrate by high-fiving the unicorn in the end zone. No disrespect, but how in the world is that the least bit relevant to the discussion?

        How about something based on the exact averages as proven on the field? If Fasano had as many catches as Larry Fitzgerald he’d have gone for 1,215 yards. If we had gone his way the same number of times as Witten he’d have had 1,269. Now that’s math with a point.

        “I hope you realize that the yards per catch average is calculated by dividing the amount of total yards by receptions. So the more receptions a receiver has the lower his average will be.” – Jayrock

        That’s exactly how it appeared in your opening argument, my man. If you believed this correlation when this thread began, but now realize that you are mistaken, no problem. I learn new things every day, and it isn’t a sign of weakness.

        If you were just practicing typing whatever popped into your head, regardless of relevance, then just say so.

        Here are the stats. 1st down % is toward the right.

        http://www.nfl.com/stats/categorystats?tabSeq=0&season=2010&seasonType=REG&d-447263-n=1&d-447263-o=2&d-447263-p=1&statisticCategory=RECEIVING&conference=null&d-447263-s=RECEIVING_FIRST_DOWN_PERCENT

      • Jayrock May 21, 2011 at 12:11 pm #

        “Oh. You were just saying that hypothetically, if you gave Nicks and Fitzgerald the same receptions as Fasano, but kept their yardage, the yards per catch would be insane? Yes, Fitzgerald would have almost 30 yards per catch, and he’d celebrate by high-fiving the unicorn in the end zone. No disrespect, but how in the world is that the least bit relevant to the discussion?”

        This is relevant to the damn discussion because it makes my point on how the amount of receptions a player has relevant to the amount of total yards will affect his ypc.

        You are trying to compare Fasano’s YPC to guys like Fitz and Nicks when they fucking have 50 more receptions than he does and are 1,000 yard receivers. Not to mention they are possession receivers so they are not even known for their ability to go deep.

      • Dan Ewen May 21, 2011 at 12:29 pm #

        “This is relevant to the damn discussion because it makes my point on how the
        amount of receptions a player has relevant to the amount of total yards will
        affect his ypc.”

        What point were you making? How does this apply to Fasano averaging more yards per reception than those guys? If Fasano was thrown to more, what would happen? My guess is more yardage, at about the same yards per reception. Break it down for me, Jayrock. How is this even a point?

        And yes, I compared Fasano’s yards per reception to Fitz’s and Nicks’. It is an official stat that is kept by the league. Fasano’s catches were longer than theirs in 2010, and longer than 26 other starting TEs. Are they Desean Jackson yards per catch? No. So what? Fasano’s a 255lb TE who can run block.

      • Jayrock May 21, 2011 at 1:33 pm #

        “What point were you making? How does this apply to Fasano averaging more yards per reception than those guys? If Fasano was thrown to more, what would happen? My guess is more yardage, at about the same yards per reception. Break it down for me, Jayrock. How is this even a point?”

        My point is That you are comparing a large sample size to a smaller sample size. Fitzgerald and Nicks have 50 more receptions and are 1,000 yard receivers. You are comparing their average from that sample size to a tight end that only had 39 catches for about 500 yards. There is no problem with Fasano averaging 13 YPC but when you drag in names like Fitz and Nicks to prove a point it just ridiculous. In no way shape or form is Fasano better than Fitz in anything.

        “If we had gone his way the same number of times as Witten he’d have had 1,269.”

        This year Witten caught 92 passes for 1,002 yards.
        So if Fasano had as many catches as Witten is he still going to have a 13 YPC average? Hell Jason Witten himself doesnt even have a 13 YPC average but according to you Fasano is a better seam threat than him. I dont think there is a person in the world that would chose Fasano over Witten.

      • Dan Ewen May 21, 2011 at 2:51 pm #

        Once you take the stuff out about more catches leading to a decreased average you make much more sense. Is Fasano more valuable than a 1,200 yard WR? Nope, and I never said that. Would I trade him for Witten? Yes sir.

        But if having more yards per catch than those receivers isn’t impressive, then how come so few TEs did it? If moving the chains three out of four touches isn’t impressive then how come only 6 starting wideouts and 2 TEs did it? Eight human beings in the league had a higher 1st down conversion rate than Fasano.

        Props to Anthony for being one of the few guys on offense who carried their share of the load.

      • Jayrock May 21, 2011 at 4:10 pm #

        “But if having more yards per catch than those receivers isn’t impressive, then how come so few TEs did it?”

        Because tight ends are not fucking flanker receivers! The tight ends that did are athletic enough to truly create mismatches an stretch a defense. Antonio Gates, Vernon Davis, Jermichael Finely, Todd Heap, Kevin Boss, Joel Dreessen, etc. Some teams utilize tight end more than others but everyone knows guys like Davis, Gates, and Finely are among the elite in the NFL. And though stats may not support it im pretty sure there are a ton of Dolphin fans that would rather have Aaron Hernandez and Rob Gronkowski.

        “If moving the chains three out of four touches isn’t impressive then how come only 6 starting wideouts and 2 TEs did it? Eight human beings in the league had a higher 1st down conversion rate than Fasano.”

        Actually you couldnt be more wrong. If your going by stats technically there where 63 receivers that had the same or a higher conversion percentage.
        So you can keep riding Fasanos jock as if he is among the NFL elite but at the end of the day no one is dumb enough to mention him in the same breath as guys such as Antonio Gates and other top tight ends in the league. Fasano is a decent player but your trying to hype him up to be somethin he isnt. Anyone who watched every game this year would tell you that Fasano was invisible most of the time and noone will confuse him for being a great receiving TE nor would they compare him to the likes of elite receivers such as Fitzgerald

      • Dan Ewen May 21, 2011 at 4:27 pm #

        Really Jay Rock? You’re including the guys with 4 catches? 1 catch? 2 catches? A minute ago you were Mr. Sample Size.

        Look, it’s been a long day for you. Less than 24 hours ago you argued that Hakeem Nicks’ yards per catch were lower because he had…more catches?

        You’ve increased your football IQ by leaps and bounds during this thread, and for that I say, “You’re welcome.”

        Good day.

    • corners May 22, 2011 at 9:11 am #

      “and the only reason his yards per catch is comparable with Fasano is because of the inconsistent play at QB the Cardinals had last year”

      How is that any different then Fasano who also had to deal with inconsistent qb play?

      • Dan Ewen May 22, 2011 at 9:39 am #

        A fair question. Now, the Cardinals did have deplorable QB play last season, but Fitz’s career average is also below Fasano’s 2010 mark. Three seasons Larry’s been beneath it.

        I’m not saying Fasano is as good as him, but he has been doing a good job of getting downfield and moving the chains when we’ve called his number.

        Thanks for stopping by The Bottlenose

  4. dolfanshannon May 21, 2011 at 9:45 am #

    Good article. I think with better QB play and a speed reciever on the outside (Gates) that Fasano will only get better. He had some drop issues that got into his head, but he seemed to correct those issues. Also with better line play he will be able to run routes more often rather than stay in to block.

    • Dan Ewen May 21, 2011 at 10:19 am #

      Thanks, Dolfan Shannon. I hope E. Gates can open up the field for us a little bit. If he’s the real deal we could have the perfect trio of WRs, a burner, a slot, and a Beast.

      Interesting to note that Kevin Boss had more yards per catch than Fasano. Boss isn’t exactly Vernon Davis. Apparently the trio of Manningham, Nicks and Steve Smith opened up the field for him pretty well. The same could happen for Fasano.

      Thanks for the comment. Stop by anytime.

  5. Dan Ewen May 21, 2011 at 5:02 pm #

    COMMENT DELETED DUE TO 7TH GRADER LANGUAGE AND CRUDE REFERENCES TO PERFORMING FELLATIO ON ANTHONY FASANO.

    NOTE: FLOWERY DESCRIPTIONS OF FELLATIO WILL BE ACCEPTED.

  6. Pickettilli May 21, 2011 at 6:19 pm #

    Wow Dan showing some fire lol, you and Jayrock should just get married already. Felatio Fasano, lol thats what Ill call him from now on lol. Always comical and not usually statistical, thanks Dan.

    • Dan Ewen May 21, 2011 at 6:27 pm #

      Haaaaaahaaaa! The lockout’s got everyone coming out blazing!

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. If Matt Moore is the Answer, What Does Our Draft Look Like? « - November 22, 2011

    [...] catch a glimpse of H-back Charles Clay this week? Not to mention we’ve already pointed out Fasano’s under-appreciated skills in a past piece. So we’re not going to jump for a TE this high in the first round either. Marshall and Bess [...]

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